East Carbon

Just off Highway 6 on Highway 123 is the town of East Carbon. East Carbon was incorporated on July 23, 1973, from the merger of the two struggling mining towns of Dragerton and Columbia. On January 1, 2014, the city merged with the neighboring city of Sunnyside.

Historic

East Carbon

In an old railyard south East you’ll find the Columbia Coke Oven Ruins. The front wall of these ovens, including the oven doors, has been removed in order to protect the public, but much of the structures are still standing. You will also see the old Carbon County Railroad Building there. Coal and the railroad were once big economic drivers for this area.

In the early 1900s, coke ovens were used to convert coal into coke, a very hot-burning fuel that was used in the furnaces of almost all of the early metal smelters. The ovens were dome-shaped, about 15 feet tall and 15 feet wide, with a flat bottom. Trains delivered coal from the local mines, dropping it into the tops of the ovens until it stood three to four feet high. Then it was heated at a very high temperature to create coke, which was then shipped to California steel mills to help with steel production.

In the 1930s, coking operations slowed down and finally sat idle. After Henry Kaiser leased the Sunnyside mines and coke ovens around 1943, they ran 24/7 until they were closed down in 1958.

Be careful as you venture out to tour old structures in East Carbon. Locals say a ghost named La Llorona roams the foothills of East Carbon. Said to be looking for her sons who drowned in a nearby river, La Llorona can be heard “wailing” into the night searching for her children after dark. Many local children grew up hearing the stories of La Llorona, and parents warned them not to be out after dark. This may be another folklore tale to get children to mind, but, nevertheless, the story has been told for many years.

East Carbon

Attractions

Bo Huff Car Museum

Bo Huff is a local legend known for his automobile collection and restoration. At the museum, visitors will be greeted with memorabilia and automobiles that Bo Huff and his crew worked on and collected through decades of work.
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Bruin Point

Located 5,000 feet above the neighboring highway, Bruin Point visitors will traverse a portion of the Book Cliffs on this trail. Old mining ruins in the area provide a unique experience with an abandoned tram system still in place.
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Range Creek, Utah's Secret Canyon

Range Creek Canyon, located in the Carbon Corridor, is a deep canyon cut into the Tavaputs Plateau. The canyon is often referred to as Utah’s Secret Canyon, as it was held as private land until 2003 when the landowner, recognizing the significance of the archaeological remains scattered throughout the canyon, sold the land to the state of Utah to ensure its preservation and protection. Archaeologists have discovered hundreds of sites that once belonged to the Fremont people tucked into the hills and valleys throughout the years.

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Historic Coke Ovens

In an old railyard south of East Carbon, you’ll find the Columbia Coke Oven Ruins. The front wall of these ovens, including the oven doors, has been removed in order to protect the public, but much of the structures are still standing. You will also see the old Carbon County Railroad Building there. Coal and the railroad were once big economic drivers for this area.

Learn More
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East Carbon

Amenities

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Carbon Golf Course@2x

Intro text about all the amenities available to guests visiting the city.

  • Art Galleries
  • Swimming Pools
  • Theaters
  • Museums

Upcoming

Events

For a small town, there is lots going on! Check out the events calendar to learn more about what is happening around town.

Food &

Dining

Club Mecca_Philly Chicken

Welcome to Corridor, come see what we’ve got to eat.

Lodging

Holiday Inn Express-P 1

Stay for or a night or a week, there's lots to see while you're here.